Exercise or Diet controls blood pressure?

Swimming Dancing The Department of Health and Human Services recommends getting at least minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week, or a mixture of moderate and vigorous activity. Of the week Aim for at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity most days.

If you can’t set aside that much time at once, remember that shorter bursts of activity count, too. You can break up your workout into three minute sessions of aerobic exercise and get the same benefit as one minute session. Also, a day if you sit for several hours, try to reduce the amount of time you spend sitting.

Research has found that much sedentary time can contribute to many health conditions too. Aim for five to 10 minutes of low-intensity physical activity – such as getting up to get a drink of water or going on a short walk – each hour.

Consider setting a reminder in your email calendar or on your smartphone. Weight training and high blood pressure Weight training can cause a short-term increase in blood pressure during exercise. This increase can be dramatic, based on how much weight you lift.

But weightlifting can also have long-term benefits to blood pressure that outweigh the risk of a short-term spike for most people. And it can improve other aspects of cardiovascular health that can help to reduce overall cardiovascular risk.

The Department of Health and Human Services recommends incorporating strength training exercises of all the major muscle groups into a fitness routine at least two times a week.

If you have high blood pressure and you’d like to include weight training in your fitness program, remember: Learn and use proper form. Using proper technique and form when weight training reduces the risk of injury. Don’t hold your breath. Holding your breath during exertion can cause dangerous spikes in blood pressure.

Instead, breathe easily and continually during each exercise. Lift lighter weights more times. Heavier weights require more strain, which can cause a greater increase in blood pressure.

You can challenge your muscles with lighter weights by increasing the true number of repetitions you do. Listen to your body. Stop your activity immediately if you become severely out of breath or dizzy, or if you experience chest pressure or pain. If you have high blood pressure, get your doctor’s OK before adding weight training exercises to your fitness routine. When you need your doctor’s OK Sometimes it’s best to check with your doctor before you jump into an exercise program, especially if: You’re a man older than age 45 or a woman older than age You smoke or quit smoking in the past six months.

You’re obese or overweight. You have a chronic health condition, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or lung disease. You have high cholesterol or high blood pressure. You’ve had a heart attack. You have a grouped family history of heart-related problems before age 55 in men and age 65 in women. You feel discomfort or pain in your chest, jaw, arms or neck during activity.

You become dizzy with exertion. You’re unsure if you’re in good health or you haven’t been exercising regularly. If you regularly take any medication, ask your doctor if exercising will make it work differently or change its side effects – or if your medication will affect the way your body reacts to exercise. Keep it safe To reduce the risk of injury while exercising, start slowly. Remember to warm up before you exercise and cool afterward down. Build up the intensity of your workouts gradually.

Stop exercising and seek immediate medical care if any warning is experienced by you signs during exercise, including: Chest, neck, jaw or arm pain or tightness Dizziness or faintness An irregular heartbeat Monitor your progress The only way to identify high blood pressure is to keep track of your blood pressure readings. Have your blood pressure checked at each doctor’s visit, or use a true home blood pressure monitor.

If you have high blood pressure already, home monitoring can let you know if your fitness routine is helping to lower your blood pressure, and may make it so you don’t need to visit your doctor to have your blood pressure checked as often.

Home blood pressure monitoring isn’t a substitute for visits to your doctor, and home blood pressure monitors might have some limitations. If you decide to monitor your blood pressure at home, you’ll get the most accurate readings if you check your blood pressure before you exercise.

Exercise or Diet controls blood pressure?

One thought on “Exercise or Diet controls blood pressure?

  • 22.04.2020 at 03:21
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    Winner of a video, I been tryin to find out about managing blood pressure for a while now, and I think this has helped. You ever tried – Handadison Pressure Amalgamation – (do a google search ) ? Ive heard some pretty good things about it and my m8 got cool results with it.

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